Disgraced: Sydney Theatre Company

Yup, 20th show this year and it was wonderful!! The script was funny, the cast was great and one of my favourites, *Rose Byrne* certainly didn’t disappoint.

#sydneytheatre #speedtheplow #rosebyrne #theatrenerd #theatregeek #play#aussietheatre #sydneytheatrecompany

I’m very grateful I could have the theatre as one of my mental wellness strategies… and still 2 more shows to go. How will I top this next year? #ayearoftheatre, maybe? #mentalwellness #laughteristhebestmesicine (at Roslyn Packer Theatre Walsh Bay)

Organic Aroma Essential Oil Diffuser Review

I have been given this product as part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company.

I was excited to have been given the opportunity to try and IMG_0045.jpgreview Organic Aroma’s Nebulizing Essential Oil Diffuser. Unlike other diffusers, a nebuliser does not use heat or water, making it safe, convenient and mess-free. Because the oils aren’t diluted, the essential oils are well dispersed in a large room, offering a powerful, pure aroma and greater therapeutic value of the essential oils. It also doesn’t increase the humidity of the air, which is very appealing to someone who lives in a humid environment.

In the past, I have been quite sceptical about aromatherapy, but after some research, I saw that it could be beneficial for relaxation. Relaxation, meditation and mindfulness are necessary for treating and managing chronic pain, depression and anxiety.IMG_0160.jpg

Picking from all the beautiful designs was hard, but I ended up choosing the Raindrop diffuser. Shipped from the USA, it arrived a lot sooner than expected. As someone who likes beautiful things, I appreciate how well packaged it was – it was evident this I was about to try a high-quality product. It’s delicate and even prettier than the pictures on their website. I was also pleasantly surprised to have received two different samples of their essential oil blends. Talk about value!

Assembling the diffuser is as easy as placing the glass reservoir into the hardwood base and connect the power the supply… And because it’s gorgeous, I was happy to leave it set up in the dining room. Once the oil was in the reservoir and the diffuser turned on, it only took a second to smell the aromas… and I enjoyed it!

When I used the diffuser alongside other techniques, like deep breathing, visualisation and mindfulness, I was able to relax a bit quicker than usually. I really love the aromas and prefer it to incense, so after a few days turning the diffuser on had become a bit of a habit. Without thinking, I had turned it on while I was working on a major essay. I found myself super chill and relaxed when I would usually be stressed and anxious. As a result, I was even more productive.

The diffuser has an inbuilt light that changes colours, and I had seen pictures of this. I confess, I thought it looked kind of tacky. However, once I started using the diffuser, I found the slow colour changes of the light enhanced my relaxation. I would still like the option to turn off the light, though.

I was pleasantly surprised at how quiet the diffuser is and it uses a minuscule amount of electricity. Although I have nothing to compare with it, I’ve also been pleasantly surprised with how long the oil lasts in the reservoir.

Although I haven’t experienced any pain relief from using Organic Aromas diffuser, it definitely helps enhance relaxation and reducing anxiety when used in conjunction with other techniques.IMG_0141.jpg

All in all, I love my diffuser (and so does Annie)! I will continue to use it as part of my relaxation and mindfulness routine and look forward to experimenting with different essential oil blends (feel free to comment with any suggestions).

You can buy your own Nebulizing Essential Oil Diffuser from Organic Aroma’s website. The cost for a diffuser with an essential oil blend sample starts at $95 USD, and there are five beautiful designs to choose from. Organic Aromas also offers custom laser printed diffusers for $125USD and a large selection of stunning hand carved diffusers for $175USD. They also offer free shipping worldwide!

TMS: The Treatment For Depression You Haven’t Heard Of

One million people in Australia have depression, two million have anxiety, and many have both.

Most individuals who seek treatment for depression recover. Because our brain is continually being moulded and has an incredible capacity to change, psychotherapy (talk therapy) is a proven and effective treatment. As we change our thoughts and behaviours, over time our feelings start to change too. Some people need medication to give their brain a bit of help while they go through the process. The good news is, in Australia 3/4 of those who see a GP for mental illness make a full recovery.

But for some people, like me, medications and talk therapy just aren’t enough. I’ve had depression for sixteen years, seen more counsellors/psychologists that I can count since and have been on medication for over eight years. The medication helps and a lifetime of talk therapy has meant I am high-functioning – I’m not a particularly negative person – I regularly practice mindfulness and have a plethora of strategies that I use in my everyday life… But despite all this, I still struggle with a chronically depressed mood, called dysthymia and recurrent Major Depressive Episodes, which means I go through stages of Double Depression. In a way, I thought I was destined to be depressed

20161011_134337_hdr

…until about nine months ago, when I heard about a treatment for chronic/medication-resistant depression called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (or TMS). So I started researching about this treatment that was foreign to me – what is TMS? Was I eligible to try it? How could I access the treatment? What are the side effects? How effective is it?

What is TMS?

The way I understand it, is that it is similar to ECT in the sense it uses an external source – in this case, a coil that repeatedly emits a magnetic field – to stimulate brain activity. Unlike ECT, it does not require aesthetic, cause a seizure and doesn’t have the cognitive side effects.

The magnet at the centre of the coil taps very fast on a specific point on my head – for me, it’s 40 taps in about 7 seconds, repeated 125 times on the left side. It takes 41 minutes. There will be a blue/purple spot permanently on my head while I’m undergoing my first treatment.

As it taps, the magnet stimulates the nerves in the frontal cortex, which is the part of the pain in charge of our logical thinking. The hope is to minimise the effects of depression by stimulating these nerves and increasing blood flow in that area of the brain.

Who eligible for TMS?

received_10209110666696672

TMS is for people with medication-resistant depression (yup! That’s me!) or those who are unable to take anti-depressants.

However, it’s not recommended or suitable for those diagnosed with epilepsy, have had a stroke, are pregnant or have implants that would be affected by a magnetic field, such as surgical clips, cardiac pacemakers, implanted medication pumps.

How do you access TMS?

Unfortunately, in Australia TMS does not have Medicare number (yet) and it needs to be applied consecutively for a prescribed number of days – which means you have to undergo TMS as an inpatient.

The best way to access TMS in Australia is to find a hospital that offers it as a treatment, make an appointment with a psychiatrist who has admittance rights and does TMS and ensure you have private health insurance with psychiatric hospital cover.

Although it can be inconvenient to take time off from work and/or away from home, most hospitals also offer group therapy, education, access to allied health professionals, art therapy and lifestyle advice. This holistic approach has proven effective and is a vital part of recovery for the patients who participate and take advantages of all the treatment options available while undergoing TMS.

How effective is it and what are the side effects?

20161021_122415

When I was looking at all my options with my psychiatrist my conclusion is this: it may work, but it is just as likely not to work – it seems like a 50/50 gamble. Statistically, it’s not as effective as ECT and there is no way of telling how a person will respond to the treatment until they try it.

However, it has far fewer risks and side effects than ECT or going through another medication change. The only side effects are tiredness and in some cases, a headache. Yep – that’s it! And it has made me very sleepy!
For me then, the only risk is a financial one, but three weeks in a hospital, undergoing group therapy and focusing on my health would be good for me, even if the TMS didn’t work. So, I have approached the treatment optimistic, but without expectation.

Unfortunately, it isn’t a permanent treatment, but I’ve been speaking to many others who have said TMS changed their lives and have been more than willing to return for their ‘top ups.’

Sooooo…

…here I am. I’ve been prescribed 20 TMS treatments, one a day and in-between number 14 and 15. Three days ago I noticed a difference – for the first time in my life, I feel like I have a choice and safe in my head.

The best way I can describe the change in my mind is;

what had always felt like a dark, dense, damp forest with a narrow path and dangerous creatures waiting behind every tree to attack,

now it feels like a spacious, open, colourful meadow on a cloudless day with the freedom to go wherever I want, without fear.

And I am only 3/4 of the way through. I still have six treatments left – Praise God!

I confess, I’m a little upset I’ll have to keep my private health insurance (it’s not cheap). However, it’s a small price to pay for a treatment that has the potential to greatly increase my quality of life.

So, I’m going to embrace this new addition to my life and continue to Praise God for His goodness and perfect plan.

Conversations With Healthy People #1: The Amusing, ‘Really?’

It’s days like today when I’m struggling to summon the energy to be a ‘functioning human being’ that I remember an honest and genuine conversation I had with one of my teenagers during Bible study a few months ago.

I recall this conversation to remind myself of God’s grace, strength and sustaining power that gets me through each day. It’s an encouragement to continue being honest about life, even when it’s painful and sucky. I must confess, it amuses me (greatly) and makes me giggle a little on the inside.

I also find comfort knowing that I can come back and read it whenever I need to.

We were discussing how God uses suffering to deepen our relationship with Him, better understand faith, build His Kingdom and bring Jesus glory. For the sake of application, I briefly mentioned that these truths give me hope, even though I am in pain every day…

…another interruption (but a welcomed one)…

“So, you’re really in pain?”
“Yes.”

“All the time?”
“Uh, huh.”

“You don’t look like you’re in pain.”
“I know.”

“Wait! You were in pain on Friday night?”
“Correct.”

“Are you saying that you’re actually in pain, right now?”
“You’ve got it.”

“…Like, now-now? Standing there?”
“Yup…”

and then he slumped back into his chair with a sympathetic bewilderment written on his face. I think he started to understand, which I am grateful for, even if it was just a little.

This wasn’t the first time I’ve had this conversation, and it probably won’t be the last. So, I’ll continue to embrace the small opportunities to encourage open and honest dialogue. Conversations that develop empathy and grace to spur one another on to rely on God and persevere in suffering for the sake of God’s kingdom.

2 Timothy 2:10 (NLT) “So I am willing to endure anything if it will bring salvation and eternal glory in Christ Jesus to those God has chosen.”

 

Speak Up

As long as we remain silent, society remains ignorant. We can empower others and ourselves by sharing truth in love! #speakup #behonest #endsilence #breakingstigma

———————-

#speaktruth #love #mentalhealth #depression #chronicpain #endometriosis #endthesilence #chronicillness #awareness #jesus #truth #endthesilence

8 Strategies To Get You Out Of The House When You’re Depressed

One of my strategies for managing chronic depression is getting out of the house every day. When I’m having an episode, most days I open my eyes, sigh with frustration and then begin the battle of my inner dialogue…

“Oh, another day. Time to get out o…”

“… close your eyes and stay in bed – just ten more minutes. Feel how tired you are!”

10 minutes later

“Okay, now I really have to get out of be…”

“…staying in bed won’t hurt anyone. You’ve had a busy few days. Besides, nothing bad can happen if you stay here in your comfortable, warm bed.”

“But, but I don’t want to waste the day…”

… and it continues. I am so glad that after years of unhealthily late sleep-in’s and ridiculously late nights, I’ve learnt;

a) that getting out of bed, despite my feelings is beneficial to my mental health, and

b) I can put strategies in place to make getting out of bed and out of the house every day possible.

So, here are a few strategies:

1. I acknowledge I am blessed to have a part-time job that I love, so three days a week I am obliged to get out of the house, and it has made a massive difference to my mental health. Don’t have a job or can’t be employed? Try volunteering; it’s commitment without the pressure. Before I was well enough to have paid employment, I volunteered at a local kids club, at church and for a mutual-help support group.

2. Organise to have a tea/coffee at a cute cafe least once a week with a ‘no pressure’ friend.

3. Spread out doctors, specialist and support appointments so they are on different days.

4. Access your local community centre or mental health support service. There are plenty of organisations funded by the government who organise activities (e.g. choirs, art lessons, computer tutorials, community gardens and tours) and mutual support groups for people with mental or physical illnesses.

5. Don’t do a massive grocery shop, rather, get what I need for a day or two. This forces you to go out and get a few groceries 3-4 days a week. This has the added benefit of cooking with/eating fresh fruit, veggies and meat.

6. Make bookings! I love going to the theatre and the cinema. Booking tickets in advance can force you out of the house, lest you waste good money on something fun.13987851_1063897257012450_1674396231_o

7. Make a list of all the things you enjoy doing when my mental health is good and give a copy to those in your support network. It can often be obsolete to say, ‘do something you enjoy’ to a depressed person as a symptom of depression is that you can’t think of something you could enjoy. This is where my list comes in handy, it reminds me (and others) of the activities that can get me out of the house/bed and will improve my mood – even if it’s a smidgen, it’s worth it.

8. Give yourself credit where credit is due and don’t be hard on yourself when you do stay in bed or the house all day. Learning to manage mental illness is a long learning process. Write-off a bad day and have an early night because tomorrow is a new day.

I’ll be the first to admit that balancing mental health strategies with physical illnesses can make this harder; for example, I’ve had non-stop dizziness for five days and can’t drive, leave the house or operate machinery (in this case some appliances/hot stovetop).

For these sick or flare-up days, my goal is to get out of bed, brush my teeth and eat my meals or watch Netflix while sitting in the sun. If I can add a shower, play with some pastels, paint, read, welcome a visitor, or walk to the mailbox, it’s a productive day.

Then when I get better, or my flare up ends, I’ll start leaving the house again.

What helps you get out of the house when you body is telling you otherwise?